Foreword Online

Ideas, information and industry news for collegiate retailers



4 Important Actions for Twitter’s New Profile Design

Posted by admin on 4/27/14 11:00 PM
Topics: social media, facebook

Twitter’s redesigned profile pages are available to anyone who pushes a button to pull the trigger. Their new look is reminiscent of Facebook with a newly dominant top-third banner and left-side headshot overlooking a three-column spread. That means your store needs to make some big changes to your page. In his article published on Time.com, shares strategies you can use to prepare. Take a look at four of his suggestions below, then read the full article for additional pointers.

You can fine-tune your Twitter-stream.

The old design included both tweets and replies in one unbroken stream under “tweets.” The new design defaults to just your tweets (without replies) and lets you opt to view “tweets and replies,” as well as favorites and followers (who now appear, like photos/videos, in a smart, semi-tiled view that hijacks the middle and righthand columns). That added layer of control granularity lets both you or your visitors scroll through your dispatches much more quickly, if desired.

You can pin your best stuff to promote conversations.

As with all of the prior points, this matters only for people visiting your Twitter page on the web — if they use a client app, it’s irrelevant, and it’s not clear when/if we’ll see versions that avail themselves of these tweaks — but you can now pin your “best” tweets to the top of your feed, like threads on a message board, allowing you to flag your favorite thoughts, announcements or conversations for passersby.

You’ll want a 400 x 400 profile photo.

Under the new design, Twitter’s basically taking the upsized version of your profile picture when clicked and making it the default size against its new topside banner background.

I wasn’t sure what size my existing picture was, so I checked: 256 x 256 pixels. You don’t have to upgrade — your old pic will upscale in the new design — but if you want to look smart (as in sharp, focus-wise), take the time to re-crop and upload that old profile shot at 400 x 400 pixels, or just use the design switch as an opportunity to create a new one.

You’ll want a 1,500 x 500 background header, too.

They’re laid out in a way that’s not distracting — that, and if you don’t upload one, you’re stuck with a bland color and message declaiming “Make this space yours. Add a photo!”

If you don’t have one handy, Twitter’s offering an attractive collection of Flickr images to get you started here.

What do you think of the new Twitter look? Share your opinion in the comments section below!

Related articles on Foreword Online

Article comments