Foreword Online

Ideas, information and industry news for collegiate retailers



Could Psychology Be the Key to Optimizing Your Social Media Strategy?

Posted by Joe Clarkin on 6/21/16 4:00 AM
Topics: social media

Psychology comes into play every second of every day. How people think and behave affects not just their own experience, but the collective experience of those around them. Within the field of psychology, there a numerous concepts: theories and ideas that attempt to explain why people do what they do in certain situations. Some of those theories are applicable to social media, where things like short attention spans and fear of missing out (a.k.a. FOMO) drive customers. Check out these examples of psychological concepts that could help your store bring in traffic from social media:

Psychology.jpg

1) Neuroplasticity

The human brain is constantly altering its behavior and responses to stimuli based on new experiences -- this is nothing new. However, the growth of the internet (social media, in particular) has forced our brains to become even more adaptable.  

This type of evolution is called neuroplasticity, and the quick, constant evolution of the social media sphere has increased its speed and effects on our collective brains over the past decade or two.

For marketers, the intersection of neoplasticity and social media results in two key takeaways:

Shortened attention spans = the need for bolder, digestible messaging.

Due to the onslaught of information coming at us from various platforms and devices,our attention spans are increasingly divided. In fact, a study from Microsoft reported that people tend to lose concentration after just eight seconds.

For marketers, this means finding a way to devise easily digestible messaging that stands out enough to capture the interest of our audience. To give you a better sense of how to craft this type of messaging, check out this post on successful brands on Twitter. From General Electric to Charmin, these brands are finding unique ways to nail their social presence and messaging, while keeping their followers super engaged. 

Increased multitasking = the need for multi-channel marketing experiences.

Secondly, we've quickly become a society of multitaskers. And our ability to multitask and interact in several different ways at the same time has trained our brains to continuously switch gears.

The same study from Microsoft identified three natural attention modes that reflect consumer use of digital technology. One of which they referred to as attention ambidextrous mode, in which we "blend tasks together across devices." We do this because we feel it enhances productivity -- whether or not that is true is an entirely different argument.

For marketers, this desire to multitask presents another interesting challenge. And as a result, we're ultimately tasked with creating multi-touch or multi-channel experiences in an effort to stay top-of-mind with consumers. To help you devise a social media strategy that spans across multiple platforms, start by reading this handy guide on how the news feed algorithms work on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

— Jacqueline Zenn, Hubspot
Continue reading the original article

About Joe Clarkin

Joe Clarkin is a former copywriter at MBS. When he’s not working or studying, you’re most likely to find him reading a book or watching a game.

Article comments