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Snap to It: Three Snapchat Marketing Ideas

Posted by Liz Schulte on 5/12/17 5:30 AM
Topics: social media, snapchat, Bookstore marketing

There is no denying that with the younger generations Snapchat is the place to be. Facebook is something their parents use. Twitter is potentially headed to the proverbial “farm” to be with MySpace. LinkedIn has never had an appeal for students. Snapchat, though, is new, fresh and incriminating content ideally disappears in ten seconds. The temporary nature that makes the platform appealing to students, makes using it for marketing a challenge — but not impossible.

Snap to It: Three Snapchat Marketing IdeasIn case you are still on the fence about Snapchat, here are three reasons to give it a try:

  1. People 25 and under open the app more than 20 times a day and spend 30 minutes viewing pictures and videos
  2. Snapchat reaches 41% of individuals in the U.S. 18-34 years of age
  3. Snapchat users watch 6 billion videos a day

However, just joining the platform isn’t enough. That’s why you need a plan. Learn how to talk to the people who are already using the app. Learn how to use the features. Determine a measurable marketing strategy for the app. There isn’t one tip or trick that will work universally. A lot of social media success comes from trying and then trying again.

Here are three events that can help you get started with Snapchat marketing:

  1. Scavenger hunt — Snapchat is a natural social media channel for a scavenger hunt. Participants can easily send a “snap” to check in when they get to the designated scavenger hunt locations and then, in turn, you send their next clue until they reach the end. Several companies have successfully used this method to increase interest, foot traffic and followers. Dos Torros Taqueria in New York City celebrated opening a new location with just such an event. Using geofencing and Snapchat filters, customers were able earn and redeem various free menu items. Not only was the event designed to be fun, but customers’ efforts were instantly awarded
  2. Flash sales — Flash sales generate FOMO (fear of missing out). They are instant, not advertised sales that customers either make it to or miss out. In 2016, the Mall of America started using Snapchat to announce flash sales for 520 of its stores, hoping to drive younger shoppers inside. A flash sale feels special, like you just happened to be in the right place at the right time. From personal experience, I was at an outdoor shopping center and saw people lined up behind a rope. I stopped to ask what they were waiting for and it turned out it was a flash sale at Kate Spade™ where everything in the store was on sale. The crowd was so immense they roped off an area so they could let people in as others exited. Naturally, I got in line. Even though I went shopping with no intention of buying a purse, I couldn’t pass on the opportunity to get a good deal
  3. Spirit wear fashion show — This idea was inspired by Burberry who previewed their new collection ahead of London Fashion Week. These sneak peaks generated excitement and made high fashion more interesting and relevant to younger audiences. Your store could use a similar idea to boost store traffic. The first one that comes to mind is with spirit wear. Before a big game or event where students will want to don their school colors, make your Snapchat story recommend outfits they can purchase in the store. If you can get students to model the outfits, even better. Also, save the image so you can also post it to your Pinterest page as well

Keep in mind, what works for one company, might not work for your store. Keep trying new ideas and approaches until you find the ones that work best for you.

Increase Student Interest with Pinterest

About Liz Schulte

Liz is a marketing copywriter for MBS. Her background ranges from customer service to business owner. She has firsthand experience with creating marketing plans as well as ensuring the customer’s needs are met. When she isn’t in the office, she is an avid reader, a prolific writer and the owner of two very spoiled dogs.

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