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Don't Be That Person: Ways to Avoid Bad Twitter Behavior

Posted by Joe Clarkin on 10/5/15 11:00 PM
Topics: social media, twitter

As great of a resource as it is in general, Twitter is also somewhat of a breeding ground for annoying Internet habits. This list from Meltwater lays out a collection of those habits, and explains why you might want to consider changing things up. Check out an excerpt from the article below, and read the full article here.

Twitter Pet Peeves: 5 Frustrating Twitter Behaviors and How to Avoid Them

3. Every Breath You Take, Every Tweet You Make

Twitter’s main page displays a continuos flow to posts from the people we follow, except of course when all of that real estate gets hogged by that one single follower who seems to tweet as much as he breathes. Talking about EVERYTHING and nothing gets irritating fast. Twitter is a platform for regular updates but please make them insightful for everybody’s sake.

How to avoid: Choose your followers, as you do your friends, wisely.

4. “Thanks for Following”

There’s nothing inherently wrong with saying thank you to a new follower when you’re being genuine, but automatic private messages promoting your website or LinkedIn page are anything but. So how do you deal with the volume? Tools like Meltwater Engage enable you to view new followers and rank them by influence, so you can prioritize your most valuable new contacts and show them love with personal thank yous.

How to avoid: By all means reach out, but be sure to customize the message and speak like a human and not a robot.

5. #Stop#Speaking#Like#This

Hashtags are iconic to Twitter and, when used correctly, they’re a great way for readers to discover new content and for posters to align themselves with larger discussions. To all those people out there that #talk#like#this, please stop. You’re giving hashtags a bad name.

How to avoid: The general rule of thumb is to use no more than 3 hashtags per tweet. Any more than this makes the copy hard to read and the poster look desperate.

About Joe Clarkin

Joe Clarkin is a former copywriter at MBS. When he’s not working or studying, you’re most likely to find him reading a book or watching a game.

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